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Force Plates - Weighing Phase

What is the blue boxed area of the propulsive phase of the countermovement (CMJ) signal called? It’s called the weighing phase and as the name suggests, it is a phase of quiet standing on a force plate where the force plate/s quantify your body weight. Does this phase serve any purpose? For sure! Read this blog to find out more...

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Force Plates - Weighing Phase

What is the blue boxed area of the propulsive phase of the countermovement (CMJ) signal called? It’s called the weighing phase and as the name suggests, it is a phase of quiet standing on a force plate where the force plate/s quantify your body weight. Does this phase serve any purpose? For sure! Read this blog to find out more...

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Strength and Conditioning for Therapists: What Really Matters (Part Two)?

If I could give physiotherapists any gifts of knowledge to enhance understanding and practice around the strengthening of muscle, I would take two foci initially: 1) a tissue perspective and 2) a mechanical loading perspective. These perspectives look at the structures and drivers of tissue remodelling and subsequent adaptation. If you understand this, then most things strength and conditioning will make a lot of sense.

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Strength and Conditioning for Therapists: What Really Matters?

Is there a blurring of scopes of practice between physiotherapists and strength and conditioning (S&C) coaches? When I look at Instagram and some of the big physiotherapist influencers, a lot of the material I am seeing are exercises for non-injured muscle. Does it matter? Not really. I’ve never been patch protective. Do physios need to know more about S&C and exercise prescription for performance and do S&C coaches need to know more about exercise prescription for rehab and return to play? In most cases, hell yeah! In fact, when we work together closely in return to activity-work-training-play, client/athlete outcomes are optimised.

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Powering Up Your Fast Bowlers: A Connective Tissue Approach

Why not get some eccentric quasi-isometric(EQI) strength training into your fast bowlers? You might be saying that eccentrics makes sense but training using at near zero velocity contractions(quasi-isometric) doesn’t make so much sense for the fast-bowling action. Let’s back up the bus and look at the why before the how.

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More muscular work moving 0.5 kg vs 100 kg?

To really understand the effect of velocity of movement on mechanical-muscular work, you will see a rudimentary example of how squatting 100 kg/220 lbs requires similar additional muscular work at the hip as moving 500 gms/~17 oz on each leg during sprinting. Warning, if you are not into biomechanics, push fast forward and skip this next section and get to the take home messaging of the following section. However, if you’re wanting a deeper understanding of why WR works, then read on.

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Rotational Overload – Rotational Inertia

So how can light loads of 200-400 gm (7 to 14 oz) be called resistance strength training? How can the RPE be 25-30% (previous post) harder when sprinting with such loads as compared to an unloaded sprint? A lot of the explanation comes down to a concept called rotational inertia. So if you want to learn how rotational inertia contributes to rotational overload buckle up, the wheels are about to spin.

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